DANISH MUSIC FOR BRASS 6

CONCERTOS for TRUMPET and ORCHESTRA

PLAYED BY KETIL CHRISTENSEN

 

MORTEN RAES

I – Andante

II – Allegro

THORVALD HANSEN

Sonata for Trumpet and orchestra

Arr: Bo Andersen

I – Allegro  con brio

II – Andante

III – Allegro con anima

 

HILDA SEHESTED

Suite for Cornet or Trumpet in Bb and Orchestra 

I, II, III

 

KNUD ÅGE RIISAGER

Concertino for Trumpet and Strings op.29

I – Allegro

II – Andante semplice

III – Rondo vivace

 

VAGN HOLMBOE

Chamber concertino no. 11 op.44 for Trumpet and Chamber Orchestra

I – Largo-Allegro con forza

II – Poco lento

III – Allegretto, ma vivace

LEIF THYBO

Concerto for Trumpet, Trombone and String Orchestra

I – Allegro

II – Molto Lento e semplica

III – Molto vivo

 

ERIK NORDBY

Capriccio for Solo Trumpet, Strings and Piano

 

 

 

KETIL CHRISTENSEN – TRUMPET

COLLEGIUM MUSUCUM ORCHESTRA

Conducted by Michael Schønwandt

ÅLBORG SYMFONIORKESTER

Conducted by Henrik Vagn Christensen

 

 

 

THE ROYAL DANISH ORCHESTRA

The Royal Danish Orchestra’s emblem, the Royal Trumpeter Corps. Engraving from 1583. The Royal Danish Orchestra is the the world’s oldest orchestral institution. It started out 1448 as a trumpeter corps, and today it is an opera and symphony orchestra based at the Royal Opera in Copenhagen.

HORN

DANISH TOWN MUSICIANS FROM THE 17th CENTURY

MORTEN RAEHS  the younger (1702 – 1766) was born into a musician family. His father, Morten Raehs the elder, was a town musician  first in the town Horsens and since in Aarhus. Brother Christian Ræhs was violinist and from 1760-1781 organist at Holmen Church in Copenhagen. He also was a concert master in the King’s Violonbande (an early version of The Royal Danish Orchestra). Morten Raehs, the younger, was in the 1720s in England, where he perhaps met some of the time’s major musicians and composers such as Händel, Geminiani, Barsanti and Loeillet. As a composer Raehs mainly wrote mostly for his own instrument the flute. He becomes Town Musician in Aarhus 1733-1748 and then he came to Copenhagen performing in the king’s Hofviolon ensemble. He never got a permanent  position in the ensemble, but it is likely that he was actually  the flute player in the king’s orchestra. He tried to get a firm position as town musician in Copenhagen, and he got the king’s commitment that he would get it when the position became vacant. It was actually in 1764, but Raehs did not get the position. Instead, from 1 October 1765, he was granted maintenance of 200 rigsdaler annually from the king until he could get a permanent place in the royal orchestra. However, he died the following year as a poor man. On this recording the flute part has being transferred to trumpet by Ketil Christensen.

THORVALD HANSEN  came from The Danish Lifeguard Band to The Royal Danish Orchestra where he was principal trumpet 1884 – 1915. He was regarded the most prominent trumpet and cornet player at his time – maybe the most prominent brass player in Scandinavia. He was the first trumpet teacher at The Royal Danish Academy of Music, acted as organist substitute in our Lady’s Church (Copenhagen Cathedral), was vice conductor and played Viola in the Tivoli Garden Symphony Orchestra –  and then he was a composer. All his compositions for cornet/trumpet and piano are dedicated to count W. Schultz who had donated the cornet on which he played all the solos in the music for the Bournonville Ballets. He is particularly famous for his Sonata (published 1911), his Concert Waltz and his Scherzo for cornet/trumpet and piano. In  former time his Sonata was test piece for auditions to The Royal Danish Orchestra, but today all his pieces are performed worldwide. For this recording the Sanata has been orchestrated by Bo Andersen.

 

HILDA SEHESTED (1881-1947)

 

As a young girl Hilda Sehested studied piano with C.F.E. Horneman and composition with Orla Rosenhoff. Since she wished to compose chamber music, she had to learn a sting instrument and began to have viola lessons. Later she also studied the organ. Among her friends who studied with Orla Rosenhoff  was Carl Nielsen and she was one of his warmest admirers and belonged to his circle. Already in1894 she wrote to her sister in law that she has seen some piano pieces by Carl Nielsen “which to be honest impressed me. This little man would appear to be a big little man”. In his diary Carl Nielsen writes  that on the 10th of September he played for some friends “the Symphony, which surprised more than it pleased most of those present. Miss Sehested understood me best”. Hilda Sehested had the year before written to her niece: “Carl Nielsen has something of the spirit of the old masters”. Hilda enjoyed to compose for untraditional instruments, and in 1904 she was “exploring” the cornet. She wrote to a friend: “The cornet can get you to do anything. The first result was “Suite for Cornet or Trumpet and piano, dedicated to the principal trumpet in The Royal Danish Orchestra Thorvald Hansen. In 1912 the work was reviewed in a German military music periodical, and among other things the following was written: A composition for cornet by a woman is a rarity. And yet this suite is one of the most outstanding works of its kind with regard to invention, development and craftsmanship —- the contrapuntal work betraying the hand of a master”. The suite was first performed in March 1905 at the Chamber Music Society by Thorvald Hansen. Up to 1915 she prepared an orchestral accompaniment to the Suite, first performed at the Odd Fellow Palais in Copenhagen, the soloist was Tycho Mohr. In this recording Torben Petersen has rearranged the wind section.

 

KNUDÅGE RIISAGER (1897-1974).

Knudåge Riisager became a cand.polit. at the University of Copenhagen in 1921, while studying composition and music theory with Otto Malling and Peder Gram and violin with Peder Møller. For many years he had two careers, one as head of the central administration and one as a composer.Probably, Riisager’s studies abroad contributed to Riisager being considered the most internationally oriented Danish composer in his generation. Knudåge Riisager’s international fame is mainly due to his ballet music, first and foremost in collaboration with the ballet director at The Royal Danish Theater Harald Lander. In 1956-67 he was director of the Royal Danish Music Conservatory. His concertino for trumpet and strings op.29 from 1933 has the status of the most famous Danish trumpet concert.

Mogens Andresen